Cobham

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Oxygen Systems

Cobham Delivers Inhalation Sensor for Pilot Oxygen System

Cobham sensors will help identify root cause of military aviation physiological events

Le Bourget, Paris - Cobham has delivered the first Inhalation Gas Sensor to the US Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine in support of the Aircrew Mounted Physiologic Sensing System (AMPSS 2.6) program.  The inhalation sensor block is the first instalment of a two part breathing sensor solution that will also include an exhalation sensor block. Together they will work to capture cockpit environmental, oxygen system performance, and pilot physiological data to help discern root cause of debilitating physiological events that continue to plague aircrew safety and mission readiness. 

 

 

"To keep physiological episodes from happening we need to understand their root cause and then through predictive algorithms, pre-empt the onset of hypoxia-like symptoms," said Stuart Buckley, Vice President, Business Development and Sales at Cobham Mission Systems.  "To unravel the mystery of root cause, we will start by creating a comprehensive mosaic of information that will simultaneously zero in on how the oxygen source equipment is performing, what the cockpit environmental conditions are around the pilot, and monitor the pilot's physiological data captured in exhaled breath. This data will then be analyzed for correlations to physiological episodes and hypoxia-like symptoms that may have occurred during flight to ultimately help determine root cause."

 

The delivery of this inhalation sensor block marks the first step towards creating this mosaic by capturing temperature and pressure data inside the cabin, and the flow rate and concentration of oxygen being supplied to the pilot with each inhalation breath. Our next step is to deliver the exhalation sensor block, which will capture data that measures pilot oxygen consumption and expired carbon dioxide.

 

The inhalation sensor block is located on the end of the pilot mask breathing hose and is attached to a chest mounted breathing regulator or integrated terminal block. The exhalation

 

sensor will be positioned at the end of second hose attached to the mask exhalation port and can sit inside a vest pocket so as not to impede the pilot's field of regard.

 

Cobham, with its world leading, highly successful suite of On-Board Oxygen Generating Systems (OBOGS), pilot and aircraft mounted oxygen regulators, and parachutist oxygen systems, ultimately aims to be the leading provider of hypoxia management solutions.

 

About Cobham Mission Systems

The most capable critical control solutions for extreme environments.

As the world's leading supplier of critical control solutions, we help our customers to increase the safety and mission capabilities of their personnel and equipment in extreme environments.

 

Our proven and trusted solutions in air-to-air refuelling, life support, weapons carriage and unmanned systems, deliver assured performance and class-leading through-life costs that enable our customers to bring complex projects to market quickly, and with minimal risk.

 

About Cobham

The most important thing we build is trust.

Cobham is a leading global technology and services innovator, respected for providing solutions to the most challenging problems, from deep space to the depths of the ocean.  We employ more than 11,500 people on five continents, and have customers and partners in over 100 countries, with market leading positions in: wireless, audio, video and data communications, including satellite communications; defence electronics; air-to-air refuelling; aviation services; life support and mission equipment.

 

Enquiries

Stuart Buckley
Cobham Mission Systems
Vice President, Business Development and Sales
Stuart.buckley@cobham.com
+1 (716) 667 6492

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